Events Organized

Platforms to the World

January 30 – February 1, 2020
Opening plenary session on the relationship between media and the making and unmaking of borders in everyday life, moderated by Juan Llamas-Rodriguez and featuring Feng-Mei Heberer (NYU), Carlos Jiménez (U of Denver) and Shannon Mattern (The New School).

During this three-day symposium, twenty scholars interested in the intersections of media, urbanism, and migration convened at the School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication (ATEC) at the University of Texas at Dallas to address an essential contradiction in 21st century media: While emerging media technologies promise faster and more intimate connections with people around the world, how are media technologies themselves actively contribute to the reinforcement of social divisions and political borders?

Description and wrap-up reflection of the event available here.


The Global Media Festival

November 20, 2019
Opening remarks by Juan Llamas-Rodriguez at the 2019 Global Media Festival at the University of Texas at Dallas.

The Global Media Festival was a one-night screening of international shorts organized and presented by the students enrolled in my Global Media Cultures course during fall 2019. On the evening of November 20, 2019, we held the event at the main auditorium at the University of Texas at Dallas. In addition to the members of the class and their friends, members of the ATEC community also showed up. Each group had selected one person to introduce their short, and I gave a brief introduction at the beginning explaining the project and the work students had put into it.

Description and photos from the event available here.


La Revolución de los Alcatraces

April 21, 2016
Juan Llamas-Rodriguez interviewing director Luciana Kaplan after the screening of La Revolución de los Alcatraces at the Pollock Theater at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

In spring 2016 I programmed a screening of La Revolución de los Alcatraces (2013), an award-winning documentary by Mexican filmmaker Luciana Kaplan, at UC Santa Barbara’s Pollock Theater. The film tells the story of Eufrosina Cruz Mendoza, an indigenous woman who ran for mayor of her small community in southern Oaxaca, Mexico. During the Q&A, Kaplan and I discussed the limits of identity politics, the parallels between this story and the 2016 U.S. presidential hopefuls, and the role of artists and academics in interrogating these ideals.

Description and video from the Q&A available here.